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ARPEGGIO POODLES

POODLE COAT COLORS: WHITE & CREAM

AKC COLOR CODES FOR POODLES
BREED STANDARD FOR POODLES
COLOR BREEDING IN POODLES
GENERAL POODLE CARE
HEALTH CONCERNS IN MINIATURE POODLES
HEALTH CONCERNS IN STANDARD POODLES
HEALTH CONCERNS IN TOY POODLES
HISTORY OF THE POODLE
INGENUITY OF POODLES
POODLE PUPPY GROWTH CHARTS
PUTTING WEIGHT ON POODLES
TEARING IN POODLES
WHY A POODLE
POODLE COAT COLORS: SILVER & SILVER BEIGE
POODLE COAT COLORS: BROWN & CAFE AU LAIT
POODLE COAT COLORS: BLUE & BLACK
POODLE COAT COLORS: RED, APRICOT & CREAM
POODLE COAT COLORS: WHITE & CREAM
POODLE COAT COLORS: BRINDLE & SABLE
GROOMING THE POODLE
GROOMING YOUR OWN POODLE
GROWING HAIR ON A DOORKNOB (HAIR GROWTH FORMULA)
LOOKING FOR A NEW GROOMER
POODLE HAIR CUTS A-D
POODLE HAIR CUTS E-J
POODLE HAIR CUTS L-M
POODLE HAIR CUTS N-R
POODLE HAIR CUTS S-Z
POODLE HAIR CUTS EARS
POODLE HAIR CUTS FACES
POODLE SHOW COAT BANDING
ANAL GLANDS
WORLDS BEST EAR CLEANER
A PUPPY AS A GIFT
AVOIDING HEAT INJURY IN DOGS
BLOAT (GDV)
CANINE CPR
COPROPHAGY (FECES EATING)
CRYPTORCHIDISM (RETAINED TESTICLES)
DAILY DOGGY HEALTH CHECK
DANGERS OF SWIMMING-BLUE-GREEN ALGAE TOXICITY
DOG AGE IN HUMAN YEARS
DOG BREEDS FOR ALLERGY SUFFERERS
DOG FIRST AID KIT
FINDING A GOOD BREEDER
HYPOGLYCEMIA
INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN DOGS
INTERNAL/EXTERNAL PARASITES
IS YOUR DOG THE RIGHT WEIGHT
LEAVING PUPPY HOME ALONE
LICKING,CHEWING AND SCRATCHING BEHAVIOR
MALE VS FEMALE
NEW PUPPY CARE
OTC MEDICINES SAFE FOR DOGS
PANOSTEITIS (LIMPING)
PATELLAR LUXATION (POPPING/SLIPPING KNEECAPS)
POISONOUS FOOD, PLANTS AND HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
CARPAL SUBLUXATION SYNDROME (CSS OR DOWN PASTERNS)
TAIL DOCKING
URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN DOGS
WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A HEALTHY PUPPY
BARKING TRAINING
BEHAVIORAL ISSUES
CRATE TRAINING
DESENSITIZATION
POTTY TRAINING
SOCIALIZATION
TO BREED OR NOT TO BREED
BREEDING/WHELPING INFORMATION
BREEDING CHART
HAND FEEDING PUPPIES
SWIMMER PUPPIES
WEIGHT GAIN IN NEW BORN PUPPIES
COLOR NAMES
DANCE NAMES
EGYPTIAN NAMES
FAIRTYTALE NAMES
FANCY NAMES
FANTASY AND MYTHOLOGY NAMES
FLOWER NAMES
FOOD AND DRINK NAMES
GAME NAMES
GEM AND STONE NAMES
HOLIDAY NAMES
MISCELLANEOUS NAMES
MOVIE NAMES
NAMES BASED ON SAYINGS
NATIVE AMERICAN NAMES
SONG AND MUSIC NAMES

Note:  I have recently been sent a lot of email from potential puppy buyers, saying that a breeder is calling some of her puppies "White Chocolate".  BUYER BEWARE.  There is no such color.  These puppies are creams with incorrect pigment and incorrect eye color.  This is usually a result of browns that have a heavy background of cream.  This is why it is so important to never breed browns to cream, red or apricot.
Please, before buying a poodle, do your research.  You should never be charged more money for an exotic color or a color that is a fault.

COMPARING WHITE TO CREAM
 
These are two more colors I see a lot of breeders confused over.  On this page we will discuss these colors and try to show the difference between them.

WHITE COLOR ARTICLES
 
White  By Mrs Hoyt – The Book of the Poodle 1982

Clear and brilliant, with no cream, yellow, or tan. A glistening, startling white. There are at least two kinds of white, white 1 and white 2.

The only visible difference between the two is that white 2 is more likely to have pink skin rather than a bluish black or silver skin. The eyes are jet black, so dark that one hardly can distinguish the iris from the pupil. Eyerims, nose, and toenails are black. The skin is bluish black or silver, a solid color .

Common Faults: Such dogs may have a pink skin or a pink skin mottled with black or blue spots. This is a very minor fault and only should be counted by the judge if a white dog of equal quality with a black or silver skin is in the ring, or against a colored dog, equally good, with perfect coloring. It should not disturb the breeder .
Such dogs may have white toenails. The same conclusion applies to this as to the skin color above.
Such dogs may have a partially pink eyerim or one whole pink eyerim, or a pink spot on the nose or on the lips, with or without pink eyerims. These are major show faults which the breeder must not ignore, and such dogs should be bred only to a strain carrying very strong black pigment.

Such dogs may have brown eyes rather than the so-called "dead black." This is a fault in the ring, but the breeder can remedy it by proper breeding.

Such dogs may have a small spot of completely black hair, a show fault if the spot is discovered or is in plain sight. The famous Champion Broadrun Cherry had such a spot back of his wide, well feathered ear. No effort was made to disguise it, and no judge ever observed it. We ourselves only discovered it when washing the dog. At any rate, the breeder can overlook such a fault.

Question: Will white bred to white produce white?

Answer: Not always. Again, we cannot be sure of the number of genes responsible for white or how they are paired, but if we go by the theory that white is inherited in a similar manner to brown, we can see why a black or other colored puppy appears in a litter from time to time from white parents. That is, the parents of such a litter are each a different kind of white and when bred together their recessive genes which would normally block other colors cannot act. Therefore black puppies can appear. There are probably other genes that we do not know about involved in these crosses. It is these and the introduction of other color crosses which produce the mottled skin.

Question: Will breeding black to white improve the white type?

Answer: Only if there is no other means available and the white is truly inferior in type. As a rule the whites have better coats, better bone, and equally good temperaments. Some of the continental whites are slightly round in the skull and heavy in muzzle. Still, I have seen plenty of blacks like this, too.

Question: What is the best color other than white to breed to white for type?

Answer: Black.

Question: In breeding white to black to improve type, how can one return safely to white?

Answer: Breed the hybrid offspring of the black and white union to a white-bred white of the same kind of white as the original white.
Question: Will breeding a white and a black produce gray?
White  By Mrs Hoyt – The Book of the Poodle 1982
Answer: Not unless the white carries the proper modifying genes to produce gray.

Question: Does breeding white to white finally produce albinos?

Answer: No, not unless one "downgrades" one's breeding. For instance, breeding a dog with inferior pigment to another relative with poor pigment is downgrading color pigment. One should never use albinos themselves for breeding. Question: Suppose an albino has perfect type?

Answer: No matter, do not use it. With time, patience, and intelligence one can acquire an equally good type in a sound and healthy animal. Deafness and weak eyes frequently accompany albinism.

Question: Are there any colors which should not be bred to white?

Answer: Whenever white is bred to another color, a risk is taken. Remember that the white color is caused by two recessive blocking genes in combination with other genes. When white is bred to another color which does not carry these recessive blocking genes, any color which these may have blocked in the white may come out. For example, if a white which carries black that is masked by the blocking genes is bred to a brown, very likely the puppies will all be bad blacks. If such a white is bred to gray the color of your gray is not likely to appear in the puppies. If you are lucky, you may get a blue, but most likely you will get poorly colored blacks or grays. This is provided that the silver carries none of the white genes. In that case you may get a white.

Question: Is white popular in the show ring and with the public?

Answer: It is the best color of all, in my opinion, for show purposes. The dazzling purity of white arouses sympathy and admiration, and the color contrast of the black eyes and nose is truly beautiful and dramatic. It is very hard for any color to defeat a good white. On the other hand, white puppies do not sell as well as the darker colored ones. People feel that they will get dirty too easily and be hard to keep as house pets.

Question: Are there many white lines and top winning dogs from these lines?

Answer: There certainly are, in all three varieties. The great winning whites are too numerous to mention. In the 1930's Tri- International Champion Nunsoe Duc de la Terrace of Blakeen won Best in Show at Westminster. Another Standard, Champion Puttencove Promise, a descendent of Duc, did likewise in 1958. A white Toy, Champion Wilber White Swan, became the first Toy Dog to win Best in Show at Westminster, in 1956. All three of these dogs produced many Best in Show winners. All three are behind a great many winners in their varieties. Both Duc and Promise are behind the excellent white Standard line established by Alekai, which includes many famed winners (see Alekai Kennel story). And, of course, it is a white Standard bitch that has just become the all-time Top Winning Best in Show Dog in America, Champion Lou Gin's Kiss Me Kate. There have been many famed white Miniatures, too, from the days of Champion Blakeen Snow Boy of Fircot down to the present, among them Marguerite Tyson's several magnificent Best in Show winners, those of Ernest E. Ferguson, and others including the latest to win the West- minster Non-Sporting Group, Mr. Koeppel's Champion J .L.C.'s Critique. White Toys have been numerous, too, with Champion Blakeen Ding Ding, Champion Peeple's Sahara, and Champion Ty-Del's Dancing Doll among those coming to mind. Indeed, white Poodles have brought many honors to the breed.

White  By Mrs Hoyt – The Book of the Poodle 1982
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by DAVID D. WHITNEY University of Nebraska

 Well-groomed white Poodles, with the contrasting colors of their jet-black noses and white coats have been popular in some of the European countries for a long time and are beginning to be favorites in some sections of this country. There are two kinds: the ivory-whites with a few apricot-colored hairs in their coats, indicating that they would have been apricots if they had not been white; and the snow-whites or ice-whites with a few black hairs in their coats, indicating that they would have been black dogs if they had not been white. Their white color is caused by the activity of a pair of recessive genes, the extremely white piebald genes which prevent the formation of pigment in the hairs.
Spotting Many amateur Poodle breeders consider themselves fortunate in having selected solid-colored breeding stocks with which to start their kennels. They even may boast of their solid-colored puppies but, after a while, one of their puppies may be born with small white spots on its chest. Its appearance seems a mystery and immediate resolutions are made to destroy it with the hope that there will be no more born like it. Such hopes are seldom realized !
The white spots are the result of the activities of recessive genes which have been in the stock in an inactive state, perhaps for many generations, until in the present mating, when two of them have been inherited by the puppy, one from each parent, forming a pair which at once begin to prevent the formation of pigment in the hair of small areas on the chest. The other puppies in the litter were lucky in not receiving a pair of these genes, but probably received one which they may pass on to their offspring for making white spots in later generations.
Some of the dogs in other breeds, as Fox Terriers, Collies, Pointers, Cocker Spaniels and others, have larger white areas or spots in their coats due to another pair of recessive, depigmenting genes. In the white Bull Terrier the white area is so large as to nearly cover the whole coat (sometimes it does), leaving only a black spot of color on the head or ear. A third pair of recessive, depigmenting genes, the extremely white piebald genes, cause the large white area to further increase in size so as to actually cover the entire dog, but leaving a few traces of the original coat color in a few of the hairs, as in many of the white dogs of other breeds. The nose, eyes, lips and footpads are not affected but retain their original black color .
Ivory-white Poodles The white Poodles having traces of apricot colors easily may be identified by placing either the dog or a generous sample of its hair against a white background of paper or cloth. The ivory tints will be evident at once. There is considerable variation in the extent and depth of the apricot coloring in the coats. Sometimes it may be a conspicuous biscuit colormg on the ears or even throughout the entire coat, but in others the traces are practically unnotice- able to an ordinary observer. Some people state that there also may be pink tints in the coats of some dogs. In many coats the apricot hairs may be readily seen in direct sunlight or by using a reading glass or in microscopic prepara- tions of hair samples.
Snow-white Poodles The white Poodles having traces of black hair easily may be identified as ivory-whites by placing them against a white background. No ivory tints will be seen but their coats will be a cold-white color. Some dogs, however have more traces of black in their coats than others, and may appear slightly grayish in places or throughout their entire coats. An examination of the coats in strong sunlight usually will show a few black hairs, or by using a hand lens, or by observing prepared samples of the hair under a microscope.
Puppies As the genes for white are recessive, a pair of white Poodles always produce white puppies, which may appear whiter than their parents, owing to more enclosed minute air globules in their hairs than in adult dogs. When the puppies mature, very few of their new, small fur hairs contain air globules, resulting in a diminishing of the intense whiteness in their adult coats.
A pair of ivory-whites will produce ivory-white puppies. A mating of an ivory-white, with an apricot-colored dog will produce all apricot-colored puppies in various shades of apricot, which are likely to fade readily in the sunlight. A pair of snow-white dogs may produce either snow-white or ivory-white puppies, depending on whether or not they carry apricot genes in their underlying black color . The submerged black and apricot in the white dogs may carry as many recessive-color genes as any ordinary black or apricot dog. No one can predict with any assurance, what the colors of puppies will be when one parent is white and the other one colored, except in the mating of an ivory- white and an apricot. Two white dogs mated to colored ones have been reported to have produced not only black, apricot and white but also brown and silver puppies. Blue and the undesirable black-and-tan genes may be carried by apricots and blacks, so no one should be surprised to see these colors appear from the matings of some of the whites with colored dogs. As all the genes for the various kinds of white spotting are recessive, a single one of these genes may be carried in a dormant state for many genera- tions in solid-colored Poodles. But when it meets another similar gene in a puppy, white areas are developed in the coat. It was reported some years ago, that after 19 successive generations of black breeding, a pure white (extreme white piebald) puppy was born in a litter of black puppies. At that time it seemed unexplainable, but with the present knowledge of the laws of in- heritance, such a sudden appearance of a white puppy is no longer mysterious.
 From: This is the Poodle – Lester H. Martin
by DAVID D. WHITNEY University of Nebraska

White standard pup at birth
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White standard pup at 1 week
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White standard pup at 2 weeks
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White standard pup at 3 weeks
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White standard pup at 6 weeks
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White adult miniature
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COLOR ARTICLES THAT COMPARE WHITE TO CREAM
 

WHITES AND CREAMS - from an article by Pamela Ingram, Sassafrass Kennels

White has always been a most popular color in the show ring. It is dazzling. It stands out especially when the group and best in show awardsare done at dusk. But since every fault stands out so clearly the white showdog must be much better than a black.

Whites have improved so tremendously in the past few years that they area very popular color again with the public, in fact the Toys than any otherfor a medium priced tiny pet. Pale creams with their jet black noses anddeep eye rims and appealing little faces are also eagerly loved.

Actually the color "white" in poodles covers as wide a range as any othercolor. Granted a white may vary from the white of fresh snow to a cream sopale it appears to be white. The great difference in whites occurs not really in the color of the mature dogs coat as in the color of the pigment. There are whites with black noses and dark skins, whites with brown noses, whites with pink skins and whites with spotted noses or black noses and spotted skins and finally whites with dark and fading noses.

Now the public does not usually expect a jet black nose at six wks. but they do not like yellow eared whites as they do not see how they could clear as indeed they do, provided the ears are more buff or yellow colored than orange. Many lines of whites are, as puppies, buff colored all over.  Some misinformed people call these apricots. Most turn creamy white at maturity.

Now a breeder insists on a black nose at six wks. and justifiably. There is very little difference on the mature coat color of a stark white to a pale cream but there may be a much wider variety in the pigment ( by which Imean nose color, eye rim color and skin color. )

The Poodle Standard in color reads in part: "White poodles have black noses, eye rims and lips. Black or self colored toenails and very dark eyes."

It says nothing of color of skin. I have seen best in show white miniatures with spotted skin and many with faded noses and these have become champions. However, most breeders will agree that a dark skinned snow white with jet black non--fading pigment is the ultimate aim. Bred together they breed true.

However, for practical purposes the almost black skinned light creams which appear white are also excellent---as seldom does the pigment fade and they almost always have dark skin---furthermore they can usually be bred to off nosed whites for all black nosed puppies. Personally I would far rather have an ecur or milky colored white with great pigment than a stark white with fading nose or a half pink eye rim. The faint difference of coat is so little compared to the total effect.

Variations of whites at 6 wks. of age:

1. Coat color varies

a. stark white all over

b. stark white with cream ears

c. buff color all over slightly deeper ears

2. Skin color varies

a. blackish skin all over especially stomach and foot pads

b. silver skin is deep pink red and tans to blue when clipped & sun exposed.

c. spotted skin. Note spots on stomach. Remains spotted throughout life.

d. pale pink skin---stays pink

3. Nose pigment varies

a. Jet deep black---should not fade.

b. spotted nose---big heavy spots, mostly filled in now, will cover at 3 mon. and hold.

c. tiny brownish black speckles covering most of nose. Will fade at maturity.

d. no pigment or very light pigment, no eye rim pigment.

Some people like pink skinned white with black noses and others prefer dark skinned white with black noses. Either is correct. White bred to white usually produces white. In my experience it always breeds true. Only the all over dark skinned whites with no skin color-break may be bred to color.

Pink skinned and especially spotted skinned whites are dangerous as the spots may become spotted hair instead of only the skin.

Unless you really know your line it is safer to stay within your color. But when you have a white (irrespective of what colors it came from) you can on my experience, safely breed it to another white irrespective of it's color background.

When you have your litter of tiny black nosed stark white puppies with their little fat purple stomachs I can assure you there is nothing so beautiful. You will never get tired of just looking at them.

GENERAL TIPS ON WHITES

1. To help deepen fading pigment, sunshine, vitamins B & C, top health.

2. To get pigment in your puppies, chose a black skinned, black nosed sire ( either white or light cream)

3. Do not breed a spotted skinned white to a darker colored dog.

4. Use ordinary corn starch as a cleansing agent.

5. Keep on white paper or towels.

from an article by Pamela Ingram, Sassafrass Kennels

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WHITE AND CREAM By Mackey J. Irick Jr – The New Poodle 1986


A beautiful white Poodle is a spectacular sight in the show ring. There are, however, two very different types of whites and they are often difficult to distinguish between at maturity. These are the true whites (ice whites or paper whites) and the cream whites which are so light (faded) as to appear totally white.

The two terms "white" and "cream" should not be used loosely and incorrectly as they so often are. It can be seen that they are absolutely different colors, though both recessive-the first the total absence of color, the other the furthest dilution of brown.

Professor David D. Whitney's summary and conclusion after extensive examination of hair samples of a number of white breeds, including white Poodles, stated "The Poodles with icy white coats belong to the black hair type, those with warmer tones in their white coats belong to the yellow hair type. Corroborated by microscopic examinations and breeding reports. ",The black haired type have dark eyes and black eye~rims, lips and noses. Those of the yellow type may have light eyes, and brown eye~rims, lips and noses in the case of apricots and creams. All creams and apricots with dark eyes, eye~rims, lips and noses have a predominance of black haired inheritance. Thus, scientific data confirms the experience of practical breeders. It is, of course, obvious that white dogs of colored breeding that carry even a tiny amount of color even in a few hairs of their coat are not genetically white, and undoubtedly carry cream and possibly apricot genes as well.

The late Commander T. Norman Hinton wrote in the English Our Dogs of considerable work done by him and other British breeders on this subject. His finding was that many white Poodles that look white are in reality faded creams and not genetically pure white at all. He believed, after a great many years of breeding whites exclusively, that the puppy that is whelped cream and later turns white is simply a faded cream and should be considered cream throughout life.



The fact that the color bred whites usually offered far superior genetic background for type ( as in the cases of Ch. Snow Boy of Fircot and Ch. Summercourt Square Dancer of Fircot ) made them popular at stud. In addition to superior type, the cream whites usually have dark skin pigment, black points and non-patterned skin. The cream whites, primarily through Square Dancer and his great influence, have dominated the Miniature show ring for years.



The glistening ice white Standards (as best exemplified by the earlier Alekais) are seen less frequently due to black crosses at Alekai and elsewhere. Cream or cream whites are often beautiful animals with excellent pigment. Ch. Acadia Command Performance, Best in Show at Westminster in 1973, was a beautiful example of a faded cream. The point being made is that there are two different types of whites and breeders should be aware of this fact.

Fortunately, two whites ( or faded whites ), irrespective of their back- grounds, will produce a whole litter of whites or faded whites with no mismarking problems.
By Mackey J. Irick Jr – The New Poodle 1986

CREAM COLOR ARTICLES
 
 
Cream By Mrs Hoyt – The Book of the Poodle 1982

The color of good, rich Jersey cream. Not just tan, more yellow in tone and a lighter color than the lightest tan. The eyes are deep, soft brown; the jet black eye should not appear in a cream, being unbecoming to this color. Eyerims, nose, lips, and toenails are a very dark brown or black. The skin is blue and sometimes a tawny pink; it , should not be spotted.

Common Faults: Such dogs may have white toenails. This is a very minor fault and should not worry the breeder.

Such dogs may have liver nose and eyerims. This, too, is a very minor fault and should not worry the breeder.

Such dogs may have lemon colored or pale tan ears. This is a fault in the ring but need not disturb the breeder.

Such dogs may appear streaked in color, such as lemon or pale tan streaks up the back. This is a show fault but need not disturb the breeder.

Such dogs may have light brown eyes, almost yellow in tone. This is a fault in the ring, and the I breeder should hesitate before using such a dog. Light eyes are hard to overcome, particularly in light-colored dogs.

Such dogs may fade to almost a pure white and have, nevertheless, brown rather than black eyes and brown rather than black noses. They often do, and this is just unfortunate in the ring, as it destroys their chances. It need not disturb the breeder unless he, too, has considered the dog as a white. The difference between a true white and a faded cream is as follows: The true white has no lemon or pale tan in the coat. There is no "streakiness" in the coat of a true white, while there is in a faded cream.

Question: Is cream a true color?

Aryswer: Yes. It is not just a dirty white. The puppies are born cream, sometimes darker than the adult.

Question: Could one establish a cream line?

Answer: We think one could, but it would be difficult because creams seldom reproduce the same shade as themselves. They usually tend toward white. We do not know of a cream line.

Question: What is the best color to preserve cream?

Answer: Another cream related on the cream, not white, side of the pedigree.

Question: What is the best color to breed away from creams?

Answer: White.

Question: What colors are not advisable to breed with creams?

Answer: Black, blue, brown, cafe-au-lait, gray, and apricot, in that order .

Question: Have there ever been any great show winning creams?

Answer: Indeed there have been, both here and in England. Champion Blakeen Osprey was a
Cream By Mrs Hoyt – The Book of the Poodle 1982

Group and Best in Show winner. Champion Braevel Biscuit was another .

Question: Is cream a popular color in the show ring and with the public?

Answer: Not particularly, as this color all too often is considered a poor white. it takes an extra good cream to defeat an equally good white, and all too often the inferior white dog defeats the cream. The color is not as dramatic as the pure white. The public often considers a cream a poor white, thus cream puppies do not sell too well,

By Mrs Hoyt – The Book of the Poodle 1982

 The color of good, rich Jersey cream. Not just tan, more yellow in tone and a lighter color than the lightest tan. The eyes are deep, soft brown; the jet black eye should not appear in a cream, being unbecoming to this color. Eyerims, nose, lips, and toenails are a very dark brown or black. The skin is blue and sometimes a tawny pink; it , should not be spotted.

Common Faults: Such dogs may have white toenails. This is a very minor fault and should not worry the breeder.

Such dogs may have liver nose and eyerims. This, too, is a very minor fault and should not worry the breeder.

Such dogs may have lemon colored or pale tan ears. This is a fault in the ring but need not disturb the breeder.

Such dogs may appear streaked in color, such as lemon or pale tan streaks up the back. This is a show fault but need not disturb the breeder.

Such dogs may have light brown eyes, almost yellow in tone. This is a fault in the ring, and the I breeder should hesitate before using such a dog. Light eyes are hard to overcome, particularly in light-colored dogs.

Such dogs may fade to almost a pure white and have, nevertheless, brown rather than black eyes and brown rather than black noses. They often do, and this is just unfortunate in the ring, as it destroys their chances. It need not disturb the breeder unless he, too, has considered the dog as a white. The difference between a true white and a faded cream is as follows: The true white has no lemon or pale tan in the coat. There is no "streakiness" in the coat of a true white, while there is in a faded cream.

Question: Is cream a true color?

Aryswer: Yes. It is not just a dirty white. The puppies are born cream, sometimes darker than the adult.

Question: Could one establish a cream line?

Answer: We think one could, but it would be difficult because creams seldom reproduce the same shade as themselves. They usually tend toward white. We do not know of a cream line.

Question: What is the best color to preserve cream?

Answer: Another cream related on the cream, not white, side of the pedigree.

Cream
By Mrs Hoyt – The Book of the Poodle 1982
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NOTE: You may hear some of the old time poodle breeders refer to a puppy as champagne in color.  AKC removed this color from the poodle color choices years ago.  Champagne is now encompassed into the cream category now.
 

Cream miniature puppy
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Cream standard pup at 6 weeks
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Cream miniature puppy
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Cream standard puppy
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Cream standard young adult
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Cream standard Adult
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Cream adult standard
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Cream miniature adult
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Buttercup owned by Betty at Dessormeau Poodles, bred by us

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I am more than happy to answer questions, but if you are emailing me to be rude, please dont bother.  It just wastes my time and yours.  As Thumper says "If you can't say 'nuffin nice, don't say 'nuffin at all!" 
Thank you.

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Most of the information on my site is from my own views, opinions, or research that I have done.  Where appropriate I have sited my sources and links to their sites.  Do not take my opinions as that of a licensed vet.   Any person  that relies solely on my information does so at their own risk. 

Thanks for all the support!   We have reached so many visits that our counter that only goes to 1,000,000,000  has started over for the 4th time now.  Thanks everyone for making this site such a success!

This site is dedicated to my Mother and Father.  Afton Jeannette Huff Davis (10/22/1920 - 2/27-2008) and Robert Glen Davis Jr (9/16/24 - 2/3/2012).   Bless you both.  I know you are happy once again being reunited.  Thank you for being my friends, my teachers, my heros and my parents.  I miss you both greatly.  Your loving daughter.

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