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ARPEGGIO POODLES

POODLE COAT COLORS: SILVER & SILVER BEIGE

AKC COLOR CODES FOR POODLES
BREED STANDARD FOR POODLES
COLOR BREEDING IN POODLES
GENERAL POODLE CARE
HEALTH CONCERNS IN MINIATURE POODLES
HEALTH CONCERNS IN STANDARD POODLES
HEALTH CONCERNS IN TOY POODLES
HISTORY OF THE POODLE
INGENUITY OF POODLES
POODLE PUPPY GROWTH CHARTS
PUTTING WEIGHT ON POODLES
TEARING IN POODLES
WHY A POODLE
POODLE COAT COLORS: SILVER & SILVER BEIGE
POODLE COAT COLORS: BROWN & CAFE AU LAIT
POODLE COAT COLORS: BLUE & BLACK
POODLE COAT COLORS: RED, APRICOT & CREAM
POODLE COAT COLORS: WHITE & CREAM
POODLE COAT COLORS: BRINDLE & SABLE
GROOMING THE POODLE
GROOMING YOUR OWN POODLE
GROWING HAIR ON A DOORKNOB (HAIR GROWTH FORMULA)
LOOKING FOR A NEW GROOMER
POODLE HAIR CUTS A-D
POODLE HAIR CUTS E-J
POODLE HAIR CUTS L-M
POODLE HAIR CUTS N-R
POODLE HAIR CUTS S-Z
POODLE HAIR CUTS EARS
POODLE HAIR CUTS FACES
POODLE SHOW COAT BANDING
ANAL GLANDS
WORLDS BEST EAR CLEANER
A PUPPY AS A GIFT
AVOIDING HEAT INJURY IN DOGS
BLOAT (GDV)
CANINE CPR
COPROPHAGY (FECES EATING)
CRYPTORCHIDISM (RETAINED TESTICLES)
DAILY DOGGY HEALTH CHECK
DANGERS OF SWIMMING-BLUE-GREEN ALGAE TOXICITY
DOG AGE IN HUMAN YEARS
DOG BREEDS FOR ALLERGY SUFFERERS
DOG FIRST AID KIT
FINDING A GOOD BREEDER
HYPOGLYCEMIA
INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN DOGS
INTERNAL/EXTERNAL PARASITES
IS YOUR DOG THE RIGHT WEIGHT
LEAVING PUPPY HOME ALONE
LICKING,CHEWING AND SCRATCHING BEHAVIOR
MALE VS FEMALE
NEW PUPPY CARE
OTC MEDICINES SAFE FOR DOGS
PANOSTEITIS (LIMPING)
PATELLAR LUXATION (POPPING/SLIPPING KNEECAPS)
POISONOUS FOOD, PLANTS AND HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
CARPAL SUBLUXATION SYNDROME (CSS OR DOWN PASTERNS)
TAIL DOCKING
URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN DOGS
WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A HEALTHY PUPPY
BARKING TRAINING
BEHAVIORAL ISSUES
CRATE TRAINING
DESENSITIZATION
POTTY TRAINING
SOCIALIZATION
TO BREED OR NOT TO BREED
BREEDING/WHELPING INFORMATION
BREEDING CHART
HAND FEEDING PUPPIES
SWIMMER PUPPIES
WEIGHT GAIN IN NEW BORN PUPPIES
COLOR NAMES
DANCE NAMES
EGYPTIAN NAMES
FAIRTYTALE NAMES
FANCY NAMES
FANTASY AND MYTHOLOGY NAMES
FLOWER NAMES
FOOD AND DRINK NAMES
GAME NAMES
GEM AND STONE NAMES
HOLIDAY NAMES
MISCELLANEOUS NAMES
MOVIE NAMES
NAMES BASED ON SAYINGS
NATIVE AMERICAN NAMES
SONG AND MUSIC NAMES

 
Note:  I have recently been sent a lot of email from potential puppy buyers, saying that a breeder is calling some of her puppies "White Chocolate".  BUYER BEWARE.  There is no such color.  These puppies are creams with incorrect pigment and incorrect eye color.  This is usually a result of browns that have a heavy background of cream.  This is why it is so important to never breed browns to cream, red or apricot.
Please, before buying a poodle, do your research.  You should never be charged more money for an exotic color or a color that is a fault.

COMPAIRING SILVER TO SILVER BEIGE

I have found through the years that many breeders are confused on the difference between silver and silver beige.  I hope to help show the difference between these colors on this page.  I have collected color articles on poodles and will post them here along with pictures so help show the difference.  The authors of these articles are posted above and below the article.  These articles are older but are very good for defining color and giving you a good idea of how to get that color.
 
REMEMBER: Silver beige is ALWAYS born brown (unless you have the very rare silver beige born silver beige) and will have liver points.  A silver beige will NEVER have black points.
A silver is ALWAYS born black (unless you have the very rare silver born silver) and should ALWAYS have jet black points.
*POINTS refers to the color of the nose, lips, eyeliner, and pads on a poodle.

SILVER COLOR ARTICLES
*Please take into consideration when these articles were written.  Some of the information is a bit outdated and not always what we breed for or believe today.*

By Mackey J. Irick, Jr – The New Poodle 1986
Silver is a most appealing color in Poodles. It may vary from a glistening light platinum to a light gray flannel, but a silver Poodle should be an even color all over with no shadings. Silvers should have black eyes, nose and toe nails. To many people a pair of coal black eyes set in a frame of silver hair is almost irresistible. Silvers are favorites with exhibitors and pet owners.

Silver puppies are nearly always born jet black except for a frosting of white on the underpads of the feet. It is possible to tell the color of a silver puppy at six weeks of age when it is first clipped. The lighter the face the lighter the puppy will be at maturity. The puppy lightens gradually from dark to medium to its lightest mature color at about 18 months of age. Some breeders cut the coat back with a No.10 blade to get rid of the softer dark puppy coat, Silver is a recessive color. Pamela Ingram of Sassafras Kennels, who has bred more silvers than anyone else, states, "I have never known two silvers bred together to throw a color darker than silver-such as blue or black." Two silver mates can, however, produce silver~beige, cream or white. Those colors bred to each other respectively will breed true. Silvers have existed in Miniatures almost from the beginning. Silver Toys have inherited the silver color factor through their Miniature ancestors. A few Standard Poodle breeders have tried to establish lines of silver Standards but have not as yet met with the success that silver Miniature and Toy breeders have achieved either as winners or producers. It is more difficult to breed good silvers than whites or blacks.
By Mackey J. Irick, Jr – The New Poodle 1986
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SILVER AND BLUE From “The New Complete Poodle by Lydia Hopkins – 1964”

Blue and silver are, of course, the best-known dilutants of black, and as they are recessive they will breed true. At their best they are beautiful dogs, but none of the other colors are as difficult to get correct in color, properly modeled in head, and sound of structure. Even now they are not the equals of the blacks in Poodle type.

The correct blue is a light, clear, unshaded blue, about the color of a light, not dark, blue Persian cat. And when it is correct and carries black eyes and nose, it can be very lovely. However, this shade is extremely rare, and a dark, dismal steel, or even merely unsound black, has very often been considered ideal, which is, of course, very far from being the case.

Silver, which is the furthest dilution of black, should, in my opinion, be as near pale platinum as possible and with few shadings. However, light shadings of a darker color, while not desired, are not too much of a drawback.

There is no more popular color than silver or none as greatly misunderstood. Gun metal, taupe with a brownish tinge, a sort of dirty pewter, and an all-over dreary, dark gray are very common, and, to my mind, neither silver, blue, nor black, and are very depressing.

The statement made by Mrs. Campbell Inglis that the famous Miniature "Leila'; (see Family Ll) and her famous grandson, Ch. Flashlight of Mannerhead, were both silvers with a distinct and beautiful lavender tinge, I believe is most interesting.

Silver puppies, like the apricots that come from silver breeding, are nearly always born jet-black and then gradually turn lighter at the roots of their hair. Very occasionally a puppy is born pure silver, but not often. The black disappears, sometimes rapidly and sometimes with annoying slowness. Most fanciers cut the puppy hair down to the light color "to clear" the color.

Silver and blue may be bred to each other and will invariably produce silvers and blues. No other cross is permissible, though cat breeders some-times use a cross of cream to lighten the blue. However, in my experience, you may get anything except paler silver in such a cross. Nothing ruins the light, clear color more quickly or more effectively than a cross of black, except perhaps a brown infusion. Nothing is gained by such a mixture and much is lost.

In Miniatures, silvers have existed from the very foundation of English breeding and for this reason have also been present in Toys. But until very recently silver Standards were extremely rare. A number of kennels have been experimenting with some success in diluting blacks with white blood to produce silvers. Although a great number of mismarked Poodles have resulted, a few pale silvers have appeared as well. Now there are enough of them so that they can be bred to each other and so avoid, to a great extent, the mismarkings that occurred in the original cross.

In creating apricots from browns, silver instead of white is now the accepted dilutant.

SILVER AND BLUE From “The New Complete Poodle by Lydia Hopkins – 1964”

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Gray     By Mrs Hoyt -The Book of the Poodle 1982

 

A solid, even gray, lighter than an elephant but darker than a Bedlington Terrier.
The lighter shades of gray are often called “Silver.”
The eyes are very dark, almost as dark as the eyes of a white. Eye rims, lips, nose, and toenails are black. Skin compatible with the tone of the hair, a gray tone, but can be almost black.


 Common Faults: Such dogs vary in color . Some are quite dark, others very light. These tones, if even, are not a fault.


 Such dogs can be almost white, an oyster- white in color. This is a fault in the ring, and the breeder should breed away from it. That is, never breed a gray dog of this color to one of a similar color .


 Such dogs may have these oyster-white areas on the inside of the legs, above the eyes, under the chin, on the inside of the ears, and under the tail. This is a form of the black and tan pattern. Unfortunately it is quite common. It is a very serious fault, and it is to be condemned by the breeder.


 Such dogs may have many darker hairs throughout the coat, particularly on the back and ears. This is a minor show fault, provided the black is not so numerous as to constitute streaks and patches. If the latter, it is a disqualification. This is also a fault from the breeder's angle, but not serious.


Such dogs may have brown hairs scattered throughout the coat. If there are enough to give a "pepper and salt" appearance, this is a fault in the show ring, but not to the breeder. If, however, there is enough tan to cause spots (in other words, a parti-color) this is a fault to the breeder. Such a dog is better not used, for the color gray may not be inherited by the puppies.


Such a dog may have darker colored ears. This is a very minor fault and should not be penalized in the ring or by the breeder .


Such a dog may have a dark, almost black, spot back of the ears, or if it has had skin trouble or an injury such as to cause loss of hair, a black spot will appear where the new hair grows in. In fact this is the new hair. This must, if noticeable, be considered a fault in the show ring, but it need not trouble the breeder. Such a spot will eventually turn gray.


Such dogs, particularly if they are a very light gray, may have brown or hazel eyes. This is a fault and must be penalized in the ring and somewhat, although not as much, by the breeder. Remember that although it can be done, it is not always easy to breed out light eyes in light-colored dogs.


Some grays are whelped gray with gray eyes, eye rims, nose, lips, and toenails. The coat color of these dogs is extremely solid and even, as well as being quite beautiful-a pale blue tone, somewhat like a platinum mink. It is not a correct color, however, and should be penalized in the show ring. The breeder need not condemn this color, but should realize that it is so recessive that it will probably not reproduce bred to an ordinary gray. Bred to a relative of this same color, the offspring will probably be  oyster-white with blue or pale gray eyes. Such dogs should be bred to a true, unrelated gray or to a related black.


Question: Can gray be obtained by breeding whites with blacks?


Answer: Not unless the whites carry the modi- fying genes necessary to produce gray. The Labory grays are a good example of this. Remember, colors in living creatures are not like paint to be mixed in a palette!

 

Question: How can one obtain this color?
 
Answer: Breed gray to gray or even to a black relation related on the gray side.


Question: Is it easy to breed grays?


Answer: With Miniatures, yes. There are so many related grays. In a number of these, however, the type could be improved. It is a little more difficult to breed good Standard grays, as there are not as many available. In Toys both the type and color are still mixed and uncertain. It would be advisable to stick to type, and the best is to be found in the whites and the blacks. If one can find an excellent type gray Toy and an excellent black related to the gray-you're off!


Question: Is it easy to breed away from gray?


Answer: Very. Gray is recessive to black. Breed to blacks unrelated to gray or even related on the black side.


Question: What colors should not be used with gray?


Answer: In-bred browns, apricots, and creams-in this order.


Question: What colors can be bred with gray?

 

Answer: Besides gray and black, white has produced some lovely creams, apricots, and even grays when the white has gray behind it. Yet one often obtains in the same litter mismarked and parti-colored puppies. For the sake of future generations it is not advisable to use white.


Question: What is meant by "clearing"?


Answer: A gray is born black, not a deep in- tense black, but a rather mousy tone. In about three to four weeks the hair about the muzzle and around the eyes turns gray at the roots. In about six weeks the roots of all the hair should be gray. The last to turn gray is the hair along the top of the back. At two months of age even this hair should show gray at the roots. If it does not, do not consider such a puppy for show purposes or for breeding grays. If the color around the eyes, muzzle, and other parts of the body is brown rather than gray, or even if there is some brown in it, do not purchase the puppy for it may never clear to a proper color. Of course this advice applies only to the novice buyer or breeder. The experienced will know from their own stock and the considered puppy's pedigree just how much chance can be afforded. By six months the good colored gray may be still somewhat streaky in color, that is dark hairs still in the gray, but it will be a definite gray. At one year it should have "cleared" completely. That is, have become a solid, even shade of gray.


Question: In buying a gray puppy as young as two months, can one be sure that it will clear?


Answer: If the gray around the muzzle and eyes is a clear true shade of gray, if the gray is already showing vividly on the legs, if there are some faint signs at the roots of the body coat of this same color, and furthermore if the black color of the coat is not a rich, true black but a mousey tone, the puppy will clear .


Question: Should a gray Poodle be more expensive than a black or a white of equally good type and breeding?


Answer: Yes, if it already is equally good, because grays are harder to breed. But very few grays are as good in type as the good blacks and whites.


Question: Are grays popular in the show ring and with the public? .


Answer: The public, as a rule, loves this color . Next to black, it is the most popular. But this is not true in the show ring. A good black, white, or even brown will usually defeat an equally good gray, for the latter is not a dramatic color .


Question: Are there good gray lines? Answer: There are several. The most influential in Miniatures is the family stemming from Whippendell Mouflon Bleu. Here is a line of grays that has endured for over 60 years. Among the famous Poodles which have come from this line are English Champion The Silver Gnome, Champion Blakeen Invincible, and Vendas Blue Masterpiece, to mention just a few.

Gray     By Mrs Hoyt -The Book of the Poodle 1982
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SILVERS - From article from Pamela Ingram, Sassafrass Kennels

At maturity a silver poodle is silver all over from the fringes to the tip of the tail. The color may vary from a silver so light as to be the color of a newly minted silver dollar or so dark as to be pewter or like a grey flannel suit. The light ones are called platinum the darker ones deep silver.

The eyes rims , nose and toenails are black. This makes for an appealing contrast on a basically light colored dog -- color that is both pretty and practical as silvers keep looking clean and smart in between baths and clips.

Most silvers are black when whelped. You can, however, always tell if the newborn will be silver and even how light a silver. In between the pads of the newborns feet there should be a tuft of all white hair. If there are also tufts behind the pads, on what would correspond to our wrist, the puppy will eventually be a platinum silver and start turning very early. If on the other hand there are many blk hairs sprinkled in between white tufts the puppy will be grey or blue depending on the proportion of blk hairs. All blk hairs will of course be blk. So you can tell at whelping.

COLOR AT SIX WEEKS

You can always accurately fortell color at six weeks of age. When clipped a silver puppy MUST be silver on the face, feet and tail stern-- the lighter the color at maturity. The true silver puppy is adorable at six weeks.

With it's blk mast of a face framed by the blk hair on ears it is very appealing.

Our silver puppy then proceeds to lighten gradually all over from dark to light grey and finally at the age of 18 mon. it has attained its lightest color. If some darkening occurs later it is because of an increase of the coarser blk guard hairs.

SILVER AT MATURITY

A platinum silver will have many white guard hairs, a deep silver more blk.

Usually the deeper silvers will have the best coats.

If a skin injury occurs either from a clipper burn, bite or skin condition the new hair will come in blk and will take, from original time of injury to complete color return, a year -- the same length of time it takes for a puppy to turn from it's blk birth color to an all over solid silver. We must remember that silvers are basically blk. poodles carrying an early greying or silvering factor and this is why, with rare exceptions or planned breeding, silvers should never be bred to blacks as this will cause blacks to look faded very early in life.

SKIN COLOR

Skin color in silver vary from pink to a deep mauve with the lighter skin usually producing the lightest silvers. One of the most confusing things to the new breeder is that few poodle breeders of note seem to agree on anything, most especially on color breeding. There is a good reason for this. It seems that different lines of family of poodles throw different colors and have different rates of growth. Whereas for instance some puppy coats from some lines do well cut back , others do not require this. Some lines can be safely mixed as regards color and others may produce horrible mismarked, spotted or otherwise poor color. However, the silver toy especially developed with careful scientific breeding over a 15 yr. period can be fairly well depended upon -- not in all lines but in many.

Silvers should be basic in a kennel. From them if one wishes, one can achieve the most glamorous , subtle, paler colors. For the first time in toy poodles whites have been consistently as good or better winners than the good solid carefully bred silvers they come from. In some parts of the country the quality of the whites was deplorable, coming as most of them did through the undeveloped (by our modern day standards ) old fashioned high eared, large-eyed, long backed little white doggies called French poodles.

I decided to breed some good whites because I never saw a good one, at either the puppy matches i judged -- let alone in the ring.

PRODUCING WHITES FROM SILVERS

The really valuable thing about whites is that irrespective of what color they are derived from, bred to another white they only produce white. If there are BIS winning whites from the silvers there are also BIS winning silver beige -- another color that breeds true when bred together.

PRODUCING SILVER BEIGE FROM SILVER

You can see how useful and safe a color silver is. All silver puppies, if you prefer, by one parent having no white or beige gene or some white and some beige puppies if both parents carry these genes. Whites or beiges only come when both parents carry that color gene.

SILVER BORN SILVERS

Another variation of a blk born silver is a silver born silver -- a never to be forgotten excitement for those who have had them. In this case both parents must carry silver born gene and as in the case of the whites and the silver beiges they breed true (all born silvers ) when bred together. In some lines however, there are draw backs to the born silver. Care must be taken to keep the eye color dark and the coat coarse. This can be explained when one understands that the points (nose and eye rims ) are dark mauve and the coat platinum.

SILVER TO SILVER

In support of my experienc, I must say that I think I must of bred as many silvers as any breeder known. Silver is a recessive color, and I have never known two silvers bred together ever to throw a color darker than that silver -- i.e. such as blue or black.

Silver are safe, easy to breed and always, throughtout the year, there is a great demand for both practical yet glamorous pets and best basic color breeder to own.

From article from Pamela Ingram, Sassafrass Kennels

 

MY COMMENTS ON SILVER
A silver puppy when born will have white or silver colored hairs between the pads of the feet.  However, it is not always a guarantee of a silver puppy as blue puppies too will always have these light hairs between the pads of the feet at birth or shortly there after.
If a puppy has white or silver hair between the pads of the feet and does NOT have a silver face when shaved at 6 weeks then that puppy is most likely a blue.
I have seen silver faces and feet show up as early as 4 weeks when shaved. 
Usually the earlier the silver shows up the lighter a silver the dog will be.
Silver can and most often do have a variation in color over the body.  This is not to be considered a fault.
Silvers usually take 2 years or so to fully "clear" their color.
If a silver has an injury the hair in that spot will come back dark almost black in color.  This patch will eventually "clear" back to the silver color though it may take another full 2 years to do so.
When "clearing" you will notice the lighter silver color will start on the feet, face, and base of tail and will spread out and up from those areas.  Many young silvers will appear to have silver eyebrows and legs (almost looking like a phantom) where the body color is still more black in color.  This will blend in once the dog is completely "cleared".
You can have a great variation in shades on silvers from a dark silver that is almost blue in color to a platinum so light it appears to be almost a sparkling white.  The lighter colored silvers are usually more desireable.
When breeding for silvers, in the present day, it is now considered best to breed silver to silver or silver to silver beige.

Silver standard pup at birth
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Silver at 2 weeks
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silver at 3 weeks
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Silver at 4 weeks
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Silver standard puppy at 5 weeks
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Silver at 6 weeks
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silver at 4 months
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Silver at 4 months after being shaved down
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Silver at 8 months
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Silver at 11 months
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silver at 1 year
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Silver at 1 year 3 months
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Silver standard at 1.5 years
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SILVER BEIGE COLOR ARTICLES
 
SILVER BEIGE by Pamela Ingram
 
Silver beige is one of the most beautiful and least understood colors in poodles.  Although the color may vary widely as it does in silver it is basically a beige coat sprinkled with hairs so dark as to appear dark silver or black thus giving the beige a silvery or mauve glow. 

The color of nose and nails is of course basically brown but may be so dark as to appear blackish brown or so light as to be dark beige.
  Silver beiges comes from silvers or blues.  Since the color is recessive both parents must carry the gene but when bred together ( silver beige to silver beige ) all offspring will be silver beige.  Like silvers, silver beige are born dark and lighten gradually.  The whole coat of a silver is usually blk all over at six weeks excepting for face and feet (  particularly obvious when clipped) and silvers must have silver faces and feet at 6 wks.
to be silver.  Silver beige are  light brown all over at six weeks but they must  be beige on face and feet to be proper silver beige.

  Silver beige lighten with age just like silvers, getting paler and    paler until they are very very light at 18 mon. to 2 yrs. of age.  As a heavier concentration of the more pigmented coarse guard hairs appear at full maturity the coat deepens slightly in color.

  The color as a color is the most attractive I   know for what we breeders call the Pet Pulic.  I never have enough silver beige pets to sell.  Whereas only a small percentage of the buying pulic wants a brown, everyone loves the silver beige.  I think this is partly because of the contrast of the light face with the darker coat forming a frame around it as in silver.  Also because beige is a popular decorator color and many well dressed women wear a
great deal of beige.  It is what you might call an expensive color.

  Silver beiges make top winning show dogs.  I have many champions in this color including grown up winning and Best In Show dogs.  But like every color care must be exercised in breeding as the pitfall of the color is silver beige lacking pigment thus losing the beautiful contrast of dark eyes and nose in a light face.  It is  not true that silver beiges need have light eyes.  In fact they must not.  For the reasons of pigment only.  I nearly
always cross a silver beige to a silver carrying a beige gene or to a blue.  Sometimes  silvers bred to light browns will produce silver beiges.

  A silver beige comes from a silver carrying a brown gene whereas  browns can come from blks carring a brown gene.  They should not be confused with faded browns or cafe au laits.  These are brown dogs.  The puppies are all brown or very little lighter on the face at six wks. that the rest of the coat  and as it lighterns or fades it will do so all over and not have the lovely silver mauve cast that makes the silver beige so beautiful a color.

SILVER BEIGE by Pamela Ingram

MY COMMENTS ON SILVER BEIGE
A silverbeige puppy when born will have white or silver colored hairs between the pads of the feet.  However, it is not always a guarantee of a silver puppy as cafe au lait puppies too will always have these light hairs between the pads of the feet at birth or shortly there after.
If a puppy has white or silver hair between the pads of the feet and does NOT have a silver beige face when shaved at 6 weeks then that puppy is most likely a cafe au lait.
I have seen silver beige faces and feet show up as early as 4 weeks when shaved. 
Usually the earlier the silver beige shows up the lighter a silver beige the dog will be.
Silver beige can and most often do have a variation in color over the body.  This is not to be considered a fault.
Silver beiges usually take 2-3 years or so to fully "clear" their color.
If a silver beige has an injury the hair in that spot will come back darker brown in color.  This patch will eventually "clear" back to the silver beiege color though it may take another full 2-3 years to do so.
When "clearing" you will notice the lighter silver beige color will start on the feet, face, and base of tail and will spread out and up from those areas.  Many young silver beiges will appear to have silver beige eyebrows and legs (almost looking like a phantom) where the body color is still more dark of a brown.  This will blend in once the dog is completely "cleared".
You can have a great variation in shades on silver beiges from a darker silver beige that is close to cafe in color to a platinum so light it appears to be almost a sparkling color that looks like brownsugar mixed with sugar.  The lighter colored silvers beiges are usually more desireable.
When breeding for silver beige, in the present day, it is now considered best to breed silver beige to silver beige or silver beige to silver.

Silver beige standard pup at birth
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Dark brown (left) and silver beige (right) day 1
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Cafe (left) and silver beige (right) at 2 days
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silver beige at 1 week
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Silver beige standard pup at 2 weeks
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Silver beige standard pup at 3 weeks
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Silver beige at 4 weeks
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Silver beige standard pup at 5 weeks
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Silver beige standard pup at 6 weeks
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Silver beige at 9 weeks
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Silver beige at 2.5 years
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Silver beige at almost 3 years
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Here are some pictures showing silver next to silver beige.  You can clearly see that the silver is a dilute of black with jet black points and that the silver beige is a dilute of brown with liver points.  Remember that silver beige will ALWAYS have liver points.  No ifs, ands or buts.  I can not stress that enough!

Silver (left) Silver beige (right)
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Silver (left) Silver beige (right)
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Silver beige (left) VS Silver (right) in Puppies
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Silver beige (left) VS Silver (right) in puppies
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Here I wanted to show the difference between the colors of Cafe au lait and silver beige.  You can clearly see how very dark the Cafe au lait is as a young puppy.  You can see the pinkish/mauve cast to the silver beige.  Notice also how silvery the face is on the silver beige puppy compared to the darkness of the cafe au lait.

Cafe au lait(left) VS Silver beige (right) in pups
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Silver beige (left) VS Cafe au lait(right) in pups
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I am more than happy to answer questions, but if you are emailing me to be rude, please dont bother.  It just wastes my time and yours.  As Thumper says "If you can't say 'nuffin nice, don't say 'nuffin at all!" 
Thank you.

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PLEASE TAKE NOTE THAT I NO LONGER BREED POODLES! I do not have any puppies or adults for sale.

SERVICE DOGS:
Searching for information about Service Dogs? Please check out my other site

All articles on this site unless otherwise states are written by me, Keisha of Arpeggio Poodles.  Articles by other people have been given their due credit.  PLEASE DO NOT STEAL MY ARTICLES AND CLAIM OR PORTRAY THEM AS YOUR OWN.    Rights to post my articles on other sites MUST be expressly given and they MUST be credited to me along with a link to my site.  I am sorry I have to post this but I am finding my articles being stolen and being placed on other peoples sites.

All photos are sole property of Arpeggio Poodles unless otherwise noted.  Reproduction of photos without express written permission is prohibited!

Site designed and maintained by Keisha of ARPEGGIO Poodles.

All pictures and graphics (unless otherwise stated) are of my own design.  Please do not take them.  If you would like some for yourself please ask.  I would be happy to make them especially for you.

Most of the information on my site is from my own views, opinions, or research that I have done.  Where appropriate I have sited my sources and links to their sites.  Do not take my opinions as that of a licensed vet.   Any person  that relies solely on my information does so at their own risk. 

Thanks for all the support!   We have reached so many visits that our counter that only goes to 1,000,000,000  has started over for the 4th time now.  Thanks everyone for making this site such a success!

This site is dedicated to my Mother and Father.  Afton Jeannette Huff Davis (10/22/1920 - 2/27-2008) and Robert Glen Davis Jr (9/16/24 - 2/3/2012).   Bless you both.  I know you are happy once again being reunited.  Thank you for being my friends, my teachers, my heros and my parents.  I miss you both greatly.  Your loving daughter.

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